Projects

Blind Spot Decision Making

Blind Spot Decision Making

Proccess
100%
We are currently writing up a project about decision making and the blind spot. As a small spoiler: We find a very reliable but strange and peculiar effect! More will be discussed in the upcoming paper, so stay tuned.

You can find a preprint here

Benedikt V. Ehinger¹, Katja Häusser, Peter König¹², Josè Ossandon¹

Affiliations

¹ Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück
² Institut für Neurophysiologie und Pathophysiologie, UKE Hamburg

Bayesian Modelling of Melanopsin

Bayesian Modelling of Melanopsin

Proccess
60%
In this project we work with Melanopsin, a photoactive opsin that can be used for optogenetical experiments. This is collaborative work with the Herlitze Lab from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum. A first paper got recently accepted in Current Biology which characterizes two different melopsin subtypes. The first version of our modeling work has recently been published on bioRxiv (preprint). The manuscript is work in progress, I’m very interested in discussing our approach and the manuscript.

Benedikt V. Ehinger¹, Dennis Eickelbeck², Katharina Spoida², Stefan Herlitze², Peter König¹³

Affiliations

¹Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, Albrechtstr. 28, 49076 Osnabrück, Germany
²Department of General Zoology and Neurobiology, ND7/31, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germany
³Dept. of Neurophysiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany

Fixation Durations

Fixation Durations

Process
70%
In this project we work on fixation durations with a newly developed paradigm. When your eyes are scanning the environment using saccades, you are in a constant decision process: Should I continue looking at the current thing to processes it better, or should I continue exploration of the scene? We are interested in this decision process and try to disentangle factors that influence the fixation duraiton.

The project is still undergoing mayor changes, so no results are currently available. If you are interested, don’t hesitate to contact me!

Benedikt V. Ehinger¹, Lilli Kaufhold¹, Peter König¹²

Affiliations

 

¹ Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück
² Institut für Neurophysiologie und Pathophysiologie, UKE Hamburg

Predictive Coding in the Blind Spot

Predictive Coding in the Blind Spot

Project Done
100%
We investigate the blind spot in an online gaze-dependent eyetracking / EEG paradigm. We recently published our findings in the Journal of Neuroscience. We also gave a talk at the Vision Science Society. We had posters at the Statistical Challenges Conference in Warwick, the Donders-Discussions in Nijmegen and the Brain-Conference in Kopenhagen in May. We further had great Posters at the ECEM in Vienna and the MMN conference in Leipzig. I love to discuss our work on the blind spot and the resulting prediction errors and implications for predictive coding with you!

Benedikt V. Ehinger¹, Peter König¹², Josè Ossandon¹

Affiliations

¹ Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück
² Institut für Neurophysiologie und Pathophysiologie, UKE Hamburg

 

MOVE – Mobile EEG in Virtual Environments

MOVE – Mobile EEG in Virtual Environments

Project Done
100%

We investiage mobile EEG correlates of spatial navigation, while altering the availability of kinesthetic and vestibular information.
Published on Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

Benedikt V. Ehinger¹,Petra Fischer¹, Anna L. Gert¹, Lilli Kaufhold¹, Felix Weber¹,, Gordon Pipa¹,Peter König¹²

Affiliations

¹ Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück
² Institut für Neurophysiologie und Pathophysiologie, UKE Hamburg
* Authors contributed equally

Walk the Line

Walk the Line

Project Done
100%

This project was winner of the one week student project competition at the BCBT 2012 summer school.

Authors

Benedikt V. Ehinger, University of Osnabrück
Anna L. Gert, University of Osnabrück
Andrew Martin, Goldsmiths, University of London
Sasa Bodiroza, HU Berlin
Giovanni Maffei, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Guido Schillac, HU Berlin
Alex Maye, UKE Hamburg

Planning: BE,AG,AnM,SB,GM,GS,AlM. Pilot Recording & Analysis: BE,AG. Programming: AnM,SB,GM. Recordings: AG,AnM,SB,GM,GS. Anaylsis BE, AG. Text/Presentation: BE, AG, AnM

 


Introduction:

Not many studies exist, that measure deviation of subjects while walking an ideal line while beeing blindfolded. This study tries to gather data and get an estimate, how big the deviation at the end of a 3m walk is. We also try to modulate our subjects performance with adding online auditory feedback. We hypothesize that performance with visual feedback is near perfect, blind performance has a significant deviation, while auditory feedback helps the subject

Visual Category Learning

Visual Category Learning

Project Done
100%

We observe learning of novel classes of perceptual stimuli in an M/EEG study over more than 20 sessions.

Authors

Benedikt V. Ehinger, Danja Porada, Andreas Engel, Peter König, Tim C. Kietzmann

Introduction

Everyday we use categories to interpret and act on our environment. Of course, this is necessary as we have to discriminate for example edible from poisonous food or friend from foe. Such representations are involuntarily and immediately accessible to our consciousness. How do new categories emerge in our brain? One way to study human category behaviour is to train humans to learn new classes by presenting different stimuli with some kind of feedback and analyse their behaviour. In addition to observing patterns of behaviour, electroencephalography (EEG) can be used to study the evoked electrical changes by different category based tasks in the brain.
Due to low level confounds, we see that a categorizing process into two categories is hard to distinguish from other neuronal processes. Therefore we need to find another paradigm to examine this process. We use an adaptation approach (c.f. Grill-Spector, Henson and Martin (2006)). This adaptation effect is used in various contexts, for example in fMRI, to distinguish different neuronal populations (Krekelberg, Boynton, van Wezel. 2006) or, as in our experiment, as a measurement of category membership.